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Ferrari colours

A red Ferrari whizzing past! I’d no sooner stopped in my tracks to watch the sleek-lined, Italian show-piece race into the distance, when to my delight, a second, third, fourth, fifth AND sixth of the same, gleaming red numbers flew past.

Ahhh!! Off to Pie In The Sky, I figured!

Not only does Pie In The Sky feature in the Australian/American collaboration thriller Lantana, but it is renowned for three reasons.

First and foremost, its mouth-watering pies; secondly, it is the brake-break or lunch break stop for the owners of highly polished, classic, vintage and racing sport cars; and finally, not to be out-done, the show-case place and sustenance for the roaring road-warriors on their deep, throbbing, equally-as-impressive, bikes.

No need to shudder with images of rough, tough, bikie gangs who would sooner smite you in half as spit on you. Many of these leather-clad riders are instead, lawyers, barristers and professionals of that ilk, who are merely letting their hair down after a hard week at the office.

But I digress! While still walking, my eyes behold a black Ferrari racing up the highway. STRIKING!

Hey, am I dreaming? Is that a ‘yellow,’ Ferrari following behind? A canary-yellow or butter-cup yellow Ferrari? I almost burst out laughing … not quite but almost!

A canary versus a stallion! The mind boggles!

Butter-cup, on the other hand is NOT a word that could be associated with the image of the rearing, snorting, black stallion, synonymous with the name Ferrari. At least, not in the minds of racing fanatics and car-enthusiasts alike!

Alas! Try hard as I might, I can find no descriptive adjectives that conjure up images of valour, speed or presence with the colour ‘yellow.’ Childhood chants of ‘yellow, you’re a fellow,’ or better yet, a scene of John Wayne bellowing in his slow southern drawl, ‘Get up you yellow-bellied coward,’ come more to mind.

I’m almost tempted to pay a visit to a Ferrari showroom, just so I can hear the adjective the salesman will use to describe the yellow Ferrari. Anyone know?

© Wendy Robinson

We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths. ~ Walt Disney

The writer has disclosed no financial relationship but wishes the report be funded by Ferrari Australasia.

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Comments on: "Ferrari colours" (6)

  1. How about Sun yellow – with the power of the Sun!

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    • Sounds more acceptable than canary or buttercup. 🙂

      I would really like to know how Ferrari market the colour. Please let me know if you hear.
      And thank you for following my blog Peter.

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  2. Nice! Didn’t magnum pi drive a red Ferrari? Or was it s Lamborghini?

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  3. Yellow is the official colour of the city of Modena – birthplace of founder Enzo Ferrari. Fittingly, it is the background colour of Ferrari’s iconic ‘Cavallino Rampante’ logo, and is considered the official colour of the company.

    The red that most people associate with Ferrari is the colour that Italian racecars were painted when competing in international races from the early 1900s until the late 1960s. Under this system, British cars were painted the now-famous green, German cars silver and French cars a very distinctive blue.

    Ferrari offers buyers the opportunity to order their cars in ‘Modena Yellow’, and for most Ferrari officionados one would suspect the colour carries only positive connotations.

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    • Ahh!! Modena Yellow … sounds like a classical name. I can’t help but approve. Now that you’ve mentioned it, yes, the main colour on the badge is yellow. Thanks for filling me in on the colours that were reserved for and associated with the different nations competing on the international race circuit. Despite the stance I took on the blog, shhh, I actually did like the Modena Yellow. The car looked like a flash of sunlight as it sped past. I do however, prefer Jags, especially in British Racing Green.

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